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In this practical, easy to understand book Alex Kakuyo explains how the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path of Buddhism can help us in daily life.  Drawing from personal experiences on farms, in temples, and in the U.S. Marines, Alex tells stories that show how the daily grind of work, traffic jams, and family drama is the source of our enlightenment




Advance Praise for Perfectly Ordinary: Buddhist Teachings for Everyday Life


Sensei Alex Kakuyo is one of the most interesting young Buddhist teachers around today. His take on Buddhism is refreshingly different. The most obvious difference is that he's black. But he's also a former Marine. The fact that he's ex-military gives Alex a very different take on a lot of issues that concern American Buddhists. 

He's not at all what people are expecting when they're looking for a stereotypical spiritual master. And that's a great thing. For too long, Buddhism in America has focused on an audience that's too narrow. Alex's writing is clear and heartfelt. He means every word he writes. I think a lot of people who wouldn't ordinarily be interested in Buddhism will find Alex's writing appealing. 

-Brad Warner, Soto Zen Priest and author of Letters to a Dead Friend about Zen 


Sensei Alex Kakuyo has that rare gift for making Buddhist teachings interesting and accessible without watering them down. Perfectly Ordinary: Buddhist Teachings for Everyday Life begins by unpacking the Four Noble Truths before taking the reader on a deep dive into the Eightfold Path. Kakuyo caps off each pithy, readable chapter with a lucid lesson that recasts traditional Dharma principles in a contemporary light. You’ve heard this stuff before, you just haven’t heard it quite like this. 

What distinguishes Perfectly Ordinary is Kakuyo’s willingness to share poignant, illustrative, and often very funny stories from his own life. Perfectly Ordinary doubles as a memoir of the author’s childhood and family life, his time in the Marines and corporate America, and the work he’s done with the insightful Zen Buddhist teachers who have made him into the teacher he is today. This book is food for your practice!

-Shozan Jack Haubner, Rinzai Zen Monk and author of Zen Confidential


I absolutely loved reading Sensei Alex Kakuyo's book, 'Perfectly Ordinary: Finding the Buddha in Everyday Life.' He covers his content in a substantial manner and his words are clear and straightforward. This is the what or the content that he wants to communicate. 

He writes in an enjoyable style that encourages further learning. This is the how of the way he expresses the points he wants to make. The examples he uses makes you smile and want to keep reading. If a book is like a meal, the content is the food and the style is the flavoring. If you take a little taste of this book, you'll want to eat it all up! 

-Rev. Koyo Kubose, President of The Bright Dawn Center of Oneness Buddhism


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Discover 365 days of Zen wisdom and inspiration for your mindfulness practice

Zen Buddhism is a spiritual practice that helps you eliminate distractions and live fully in the present moment. Whether you’re a devout Buddhist or just started practicing mindfulness, this book is filled with Zen prompts and practices for fostering greater focus and inner peace in your daily life.



Advance Praise for A Year of Zen Mindfulness

Millions of people around the world have taken up a formal mindfulness meditation practice as part of their everyday lives, but with anxiety and depression at an all-time high, there seems to be something missing. Alex seems to have connected the dots back to inner peace and happiness, and the answer is quite simple: small, consistent, actionable steps. This book serves as the lighthouse that both highlights the path and illuminates the destination.

-Mandy Trapp, International Speaker and Meditation Teacher

A Year of Zen Mindfulness is a wonderful book for integrating calm and clarity into every moment of your life. Drawing on his experience as a Zen student and teacher, Alex Kakuyo has distilled a range of useful and creative reflections, meditations, and exercises that everyone can practice. Filled with encouragement and inspiration, his book will guide you—day by day—to establish your deepest intentions and develop your best qualities, so you can live peacefully and flourish, now and in the future.

-Kimberly Brown, Author of Navigating Grief and Loss and Steady, Calm, and Brave

This book is a great gift for someone hoping to incorporate little tidbits of Zen in their everyday life. As always, Alex does an amazing job of breaking down Buddhist concepts that can be used in our current world.

-Dana Gornall, Founder of The Tattooed Buddha


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Comments

  1. Can't wait to order my copy!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I can't wait either to order my copy !

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just ordered and eager to receive and read!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've been very impressed with Alex's YouTube videos. He comes across as sincere and full of wisdom. Kindle version of the book purchased! :)

    ReplyDelete

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