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Dearest friends,

Generosity or Dana as it's called in Pali is one of the six perfections that we must cultivate as Buddhist practitioners.  Volunteering our time and giving our money to causes and organizations we believe in is an effective means of creating a Buddhist Pureland in this lifetime.

For me, teaching the Dharma has been part of Dana practice, and one of the most enriching parts of my life.  As I go on retreats, study sutras, and work to make the teachings widely available through articles and Dharma talks my practice deepens and Buddhism is made available to anyone who needs it.

However, there is no larger organization or corporate entity that funds my work.  100% of the time, money, and energy to keep this project going come from my own body and my own pockets.  That's fine, as I see my work as a love-offering to the larger community, but there are limits to what I can do on my own.

Some of the things I'd like to do in the future include the following:


  • Purchase audio/visual equipment, so I can post higher quality, more frequent Dharma talks on Youtube
  • Create self-paced Buddhist classes; complete with videos and PDFs that practitioners can use to deepen their practice
  • Build a larger, more robust website that would allow the virtual sangha we're creating in the Same Old Zen facebook group to practice together


But all of these projects are out of reach given my current level of income.  So, I'm asking for your support.  

If you've benefited from one of the articles that I've posted on this blog or one of the Dharma talks that I've posted on Youtube.  Please consider becoming a supporting member by making a secure, one-time donation by clicking on the donate button below.

Namu Amida Butsu,

Sensei Alex Kakuyo


Please click the donate button below to make your secure donation.


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